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Being You Is A Beautiful Thing!

Reprinted with permission from Kidnetic.com, a program of the International Food Information Council (IFIC) Foundation.

Hey! Being you is a beautiful thing. What’s that you say? You don’t always believe it when you look in the mirror?

If the shape of your body or how much you weigh is getting you down, listen up – we ’ve got some advice for you: Forget trying to look like a supermodel or a professional athlete. Instead, check out all the different body shapes of healthy and active people you know. Wouldn’t it be totally boring if everyone looked the same?

Get busy trying to have the healthiest body you can, rather than trying to look like somebody else. Here ’s how:

  • Start moving! Your body loves being active every day. When you run, jump, bike, swim, dance or do whatever you like to do, your body gets stronger and healthier. All that moving around helps you feel good, too!
  • Eat great! Eat healthy by following MyPyramid. Try some recipes that are fun to make, taste great, and–oh, yeah–are good for you, too! Don't even think about trying to lose weight without first talking to your parents or another adult you trust.
  • Do small stuff. If you like to ride your bike, try riding for 10 minutes more each day. Or, if you love apples, try eating one for an after-school snack two days a week. Yeah, easy stuff like that really adds up.
  • Switch that thought! If you start thinking something bad about the way you look or how your body works, switch to a good thought right away –sorta like channel surfing in your head! When one kid started thinking, “I get picked last for the team a lot ‘cuz I run slow,” he switched to, “I’m getting stronger. I can do more push-ups now than I could last week.” Now, he feels better about himself.
  • Give it some lip. If you’re really worried about how your body looks, talk to your parents or another adult you trust like your school nurse. Your parents might take you to see your doctor or a registered dietitian (RD), who can help you know for sure if your weight is OK.
Last updated October 15, 2008




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